History

A short history of St Thomas’ Church, Hanwood

 The church has existed at least since the 12thcentury, as there is a record of a Rector for Hanwood.

Chronology

1277

Earliest recorded Priest in Hanwood.

1559

Earliest existing Parish Registers begin.

1701

Church rebuilt in red brick, with entrance porch on south side.

c1780

Porch moved from south side to west end after building of a family vault.

1799

Patronage of Living (right to present Rector to the parish) bought by John Warter of Cruckmeole whose descendants (living outside Shropshire) are patrons today.

1856

Church rebuilt, again in brick, and enlarged, floor tiled and entrance porch moved to north side.

1873

All but one volume of Parish Registers destroyed in fire at Hanwood Rectory. Fortunately transcripts of earlier registers existed.

1902

Churchyard railed, to mark Edward VII’s Coronation.

1940

Churchyard extended.

1975

'Social area' for meetings etc created under west gallery

1976

Present organ bought from Chepstow Methodist Church, south Wales, replacing earlier organ (now at Longnor, a Church near Shrewsbury) and placed in west gallery

1979

Roof retiled, paid for with 'buy-a-tile' scheme in parish

1999

Last resident Rector of Hanwood moves out. Hanwood now shares a Rector with Annscroft and Longden and Pulverbatch

2003

Church extension built at west end, adding meeting room, toilet and kitchen facilities

2010

Churchyard extended again (extension consecrated May 2011)

 Features

The Font  is situated just inside the main entrance and is Norman.

The Nineteenth century Chancel windows, except central panel (depicting St Peter, from Winchester School) are made by Shrewsbury glaziers Betton and Evans. There is other Victorian stained glass in the Nave.

The pulpit is built of stone, replacing the earlier wooden structure. The pulpit and brass lectern are memorials to cousins killed in World War I.

There are churchyard gravestones dating as far back as 18th century.

There are many memorial wall plaques in the nave, dating from the late 18thcentury. Many commemorate the family of our patron (Warter); The families of Harries and Jenkins also feature.

There is also a brass plaque to Clopton Allen Lloyd-Jones (died 1918), who scored the winning goal in the 1880 FA Cup Final for Clapham Rovers, Oxford University were their opponents.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CLICK HERE


St Thomas'
Webpage icon The Benefice of Great Hanwood, Longden & Annscroft with Pulverbatch
Webpage icon Farewell from Michael